The Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTRANS) has contracted with the design/build team of Tetra-Tech Construction to implement the complete replacement of the I-89 bridges over the Lamoille River in both the northerly and southerly directions in Milton, Vermont. This website provides information about the project, the schedule, and any news alerts or press releases intended to inform the public about the project.

Project Description

The proposed project consists of the replacement of the two existing I-89 bridges known as 81N and 81S over the Lamoille River in Milton Vermont. The two bridges will be replaced with a single bridge consisting of three spans. The work will be performed in three distinctive major construction stages building the new structure in thirds with a fourth construction stage to place the center median barrier. The work is scheduled so that the first stage will be completed in September 2014 and the full bridge will be open to unrestricted traffic in December of 2015. The project is comprised of three main tasks the first being a complete design and replacement of Bridges 81N & 81S with new continuous superstructures on new substructures.

The Lamoille River

The Lamoille River runs through northern Vermont flowing southwest from Horse Pond in Greensboro to the Green Mountains before reaching the mountain divide and changing course to flow northwest and drain into Lake Champlain just north of Mallets Bay. The river traverses 85 miles, winding alongside Highways 16, 15, 104 and U.S. Route 7 through 10 towns. The Lamoille River is well known for its kayaking, fly fishing and the historic Lamoille Valley Rail Road. Paddlers enjoy an 11.5 mile stretch from Slide Falls to Jefferson for its class I-II rapids. Fly fishers from around New England travel to fish the Lamoille River waters for brook, brown and rainbow trout. The combination of slow meandering stretches, small pools, rocky bottom and sections of fast water make it ideal habitat for trout. The Lamoille Valley Rail Road (LVRR) ran east-west across the state and followed the river from Greensboro to Jefferson. The rail line is now defunct and construction has begun to transform it into a 100 mile long rail trail.

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